WELF 7016 Integrated Practices 4: Self and Relationships

Credit Points 20

Legacy Code 102627

Coordinator Susan Sisko Opens in new window

Description In this capstone unit, students integrate their learning about interpersonal awareness and the value of the therapeutic relationship, which are central to the Master of Psychotherapy and Counselling. A focus on multiple relational influences enhances students' ability to work therapeutically with individuals, couples and families. Clients bring themselves and their current and past relationships into the therapy room with them, as does their counsellor. Students will have the opportunity to investigate their personal values and beliefs about relationships and how these influence their work with clients. Family life-cycle and developmental models are discussed, critiqued and applied to promote understanding of common and diverse client issues and presenting concerns. Ultimately students will explore the concept of interdependence and how relationship is central to human wellbeing.

School Social Sciences

Student Contribution Band HECS Band 4 20cp

Check your HECS Band contribution amount via the Fees page.

Level Postgraduate Coursework Level 7 subject

Pre-requisite(s) BEHV 7018

Co-requisite(s) WELF 7012

Incompatible Subjects HUMN 7010 - Critical and Creative Enquiry WELF 7015 - Integrated Practices 4 Self and Relationships

Restrictions Students must be enrolled in1817 Master of Psychotherapy and Counselling, and must have successfully completed 120 credit points.

Assumed Knowledge

Concurrent or previous study in counselling and/or psychotherapy.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:
  1. Recognise how diverse and multiple relational influences and family systems present in working with counselling and psychotherapy clients.
  2. Critique and integrate knowledge from models such as the family life cycle and Erikson�fs developmental model in order to undertake assessment of client issues.
  3. Analyse and apply family systems with regard to the patterns and diversity of self and relationship within wider cultural and social systems.
  4. Effectively practice working hypotheses and the use of counselling skills in working with couples and families.
  5. Identify own personal values and biases about the nature of �ehealthy�f relationships and the influence these have on work as a counsellor or psychotherapist.

Subject Content

Examination of relationship dynamics at the individual, couple and family level.
Identification of the diverse nature of relationships, kinship and the modern family.
Consideration of factors such as the family life cycle, and Erikson?fs psychosocial stages in understanding the dynamics of interpersonal and intrapersonal presenting issues.
Presentation of family systems theories and approaches to working with couples to help inform working with relationships.
Examination of personal values and biases as related to relationships and how these may influence therapeutic practice.
Participation in experiential workshops to develop counselling skills applicable to working with more than one person at a time in counselling and psychotherapy.

Assessment

The following table summarises the standard assessment tasks for this subject. Please note this is a guide only. Assessment tasks are regularly updated, where there is a difference your Learning Guide takes precedence.

Item Length Percent Threshold Individual/Group Task
Critical Review 1,500 words 30 N Individual
Case Study 1,500 words 30 N Individual
Practical 1 hour recording plus 2,000 words 40 N Individual

Prescribed Texts

  • Crago, H. (2017). The stages of life: Personalities and patterns in human development. New York, NY: Routledge.

Teaching Periods

2022 Semester 1

Penrith (Kingswood)

Day

Subject Contact Susan Sisko Opens in new window

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2022 Semester 2

Parramatta - Victoria Rd

Day

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