BEHV 3018 Psychology and the Online World

Credit Points 10

Legacy Code 102350

Coordinator Amelia Henry Opens in new window

Description The world has seen an enormous explosion of activity that takes place in online environments that include the Internet, intranets, gaming platforms and peer to peer phone communication (e.g. SMS). There are wide ranging debates about the use and effects of online communication with concerns about hacking, trolling, bullying, scamming, online addiction appearing on a daily basis. Others celebrate the potential of the Internet to produce profound social change. Is the online world quite as bad or as good as it is made out to be? What are the psychological processes behind these and other online behaviours? Why not find out?

School Psychology

Student Contribution Band HECS Band 4 10cp

Check your HECS Band contribution amount via the Fees page.

Level Undergraduate Level 3 subject

Pre-requisite(s) BEHV 1018 AND
BEHV 1016

Restrictions Students must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Cyber Security and Behaviour, Bachelor of Psychology, Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), Bachelor of Social Science (Psychology) or Bachelor of Communication, Bachelor of Arts and Diploma in Arts/Bachelor of Arts programs with a major in Psychological Studies. Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Cyber Security and Behaviour must have successfully completed 70 credit points. Students enrolled in all other programs must have completed the two Level 1 pre-requisite subjects as stated above, as well as 30 credit points from the following Psychology Level 2 subjects: 101684 Brain and Behaviour, 100013 Experimental Design and Analysis, 101680 Perception, or 101676 Human Learning.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:
  1. Identify instances of community concern or moral panic in relation to online activities. (Australian Psychological Accreditation Council ? APAC Graduate Competency 1.6)
  2. Describe the debate over the facilitatory and inhibitory effects of online communication on collective action and protest. (APAC Graduate Competency 1.1)
  3. Distinguish between forms of online anonymity and be aware of the risks and benefits of anonymity (APAC Graduate Competency 1.6)
  4. Identify instances of risky or problematic forms of online conduct and be aware of explanations of the psychological drivers of such conduct. (APAC Graduate Competency 1.1)
  5. Describe the potential and scope of online platforms for delivering psychological services and interventions. (APAC Graduate Competency 1.2)
  6. Explain how psychological approaches can inform online safety (APAC Graduate Competency 1.2)
  7. Identify instances of community concern or moral panic in relation to online activities. (Australian Psychological Accreditation Council ? APAC Graduate Attribute 3- Critical Thinking)
  8. Describe the debate over the facilitatory and inhibitory effects of online communication on collective action and protest. (APAC Graduate Attribute 1- Core Knowledge)
  9. Distinguish between forms of online anonymity and be aware of the risks and benefits of anonymity (APAC Graduate Attribute 3- Critical Thinking)
  10. Identify instances of risky or problematic forms of online conduct and be aware of explanations of the psychological drivers of such conduct. (APAC Graduate Attribute 1- Core Knowledge)
  11. Describe the potential and scope of online platforms for delivering psychological services. (APAC Graduate Attribute 5- Applying Psychology)
  12. Explain how psychological approaches can inform online safety (APAC Graduate Attribute 5- Applying Psychology)

Subject Content

1. Introduction to subject and Cyberpsychology
2. Online Aggression: Flaming, Trolling, Cyberbullying and Cyberstalking.
3. Online Therapy and Support
4.Videogames for Training Skills and Changing Behaviour
5. Online Environments
6. Online Relationships
7. Online Learning and Motivation
8. Digital Addictions
9. Online Communities
10. Online Protest
11. Conspiracy Theories
12. Illicit Activities
13. Online Racism and Prejudice
1.Applied Cyberpsychology
2.Online relationships
3.Collective action and protest
4.Hacking, illicit activity, and the dark web
5.Online aggression and cybersafety
6.Online gaming and addiction
7.Online gaming and behaviour change
8.Predictors and consequences of online behaviour
9.Online communities and the open Internet
10.Learning online
11.Online psychological therapy and support
12.Conspiracy theories
13.The online workplace

Assessment

The following table summarises the standard assessment tasks for this subject. Please note this is a guide only. Assessment tasks are regularly updated, where there is a difference your Learning Guide takes precedence.

Item Length Percent Threshold Individual/Group Task
Reflection Minimum of one log entry for four weeks, approximately 1000 words 33.33 N Individual
Critical review 1000 words 33.34 N Individual
Exam 1 hour 33.33 N Individual

Teaching Periods

2022 Trimester 2

Wsu Online

Online

Subject Contact Alexia Cameron Opens in new window

Attendance Requirements 80% attendance rate is imposed in all core subjects’ due to the nature of class activities that are aligned with subject assessments.

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2022 Semester 2

Bankstown

Day

Subject Contact Amelia Henry Opens in new window

Attendance Requirements 80% attendance rate is imposed in all core subjects’ due to the nature of class activities that are aligned with subject assessments.

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Penrith (Kingswood)

Day

Subject Contact Amelia Henry Opens in new window

Attendance Requirements 80% attendance rate is imposed in all core subjects’ due to the nature of class activities that are aligned with subject assessments.

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Parramatta - Victoria Rd

Day

Subject Contact Amelia Henry Opens in new window

Attendance Requirements 80% attendance rate is imposed in all core subjects’ due to the nature of class activities that are aligned with subject assessments.

View timetable Opens in new window