INFO 2009 Multiliteracies

Credit Points 10

Coordinator Di Dickenson Opens in new window

Description This subject develops students’ skills, knowledge and competencies to address a wide range of literacies across multiple technologies, platforms and contexts. In any society there are a range of literacies, and contexts in which those literacies might be deployed. These include the digital, written, visual, aural, spatial, gestural, and tactile dimensions of meaning production. Multiliteracies go beyond the traditional textual models of literacy to describe the rich variety of cognitive and cultural tools we use to make sense of the everyday. Multiliteracy is key to our professional and personal effectiveness, as well as to our functioning as individuals and citizens in a world characterised by increasing dependency on information technologies.

School Humanities & Comm Arts

Discipline Information Technology, Not Elsewhere Classified.

Student Contribution Band HECS Band 2 10cp

Check your HECS Band contribution amount via the Fees page.

Level Undergraduate Level 2 subject

Equivalent Subjects COMM2050 Multiliteracies

Restrictions

Successful completion of 40 credit points in currently enrolled program.

Learning Outcomes

After successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:

1. Students will learn to identify multiliterate practices and multimodal texts
2. Engage critically with, and reflect upon, a range of multimodal texts (considering contexts which may include multisensory media, scientific, technological and/or AI modes of communication)
3. Analyse the ways in which scientific disciplines and cultural diversity shape literate practices by the application of different knowledges, approaches, orientations, attitudes and values
4. Work collaboratively with peers to investigate a real-world problem using multiliteracies and propose solutions.  

Subject Content

  • What is multiliteracy and why is it important?
  • “Reading” and “writing” in the 21st century.
  • Digitally mediated multisensory communications.
  • Theories and methods for interpreting and creating multimodal texts, including scientific and technological texts.
  • Tools for analysis or interpretation of digital and social interactions (e.g. data visualisation).
  • Emerging social, political and technological challenges (e.g. new applications for AI).

Assessment

The following table summarises the standard assessment tasks for this subject. Please note this is a guide only. Assessment tasks are regularly updated, where there is a difference your Learning Guide takes precedence.

Item Length Percent Threshold Individual/Group Task
Portfolio 1,250 words approx combined word length — or word equivalent where submission of findings are made in another format (viz. audio or visual or online artefact creation) 30 N Individual
Portfolio 1,250 words approx combined word length — or word equivalent where submission of findings are made in another format (viz. audio or visual or online artefact creation) 30 N Individual
Applied Project Report (1,000 words or equivalent in audio/video duration, or online artefact creation) and Teamwork Skills self-evaluation (500 words) 30 N Group
Peer Review 500 words 10 N Individual

Prescribed Texts

A subject reader of short essential reading resources selected by the subject coordinator/s. May be provisioned online, or as hardcopy (printed).

Teaching Periods

Spring

Bankstown

Day

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Penrith (Kingswood)

Day

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Parramatta - Victoria Rd

Day

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